Monday, October 28, 2019

Brussels: Denis Dailleux Egypte/Ghana

Do not miss the incredible work of Denis Dailleux at Box Gallerie in Brussels.
He will be at the closing reception on November 2, 2019 from 4 to 8 PM.



More information: HERE

Friday, October 25, 2019

Amsterdam: Brassaï

Foam is proud to present the first retrospective of Brassaï in the Netherlands. The French photographer of Hungarian descent is considered a key figure of 20th-century photography.








Brassaï (1899- 1984) created countless iconic images of 1930s Parisian life. He was famous for capturing the grittier aspects of the city, but also documented high society, including the ballet, opera, and intellectuals - among them his friends and contemporaries like Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Henri Matisse. The exhibition at Foam traces his career with over 170 vintage prints, plus a selection of drawings, a sculpture and documentary material.

Brassaï gathers many of the artistic facets of the photographer, from photos to drawings of female nudes. It is organized in twelve thematic sections: Paris by Day, and by Night, Minotaure, Graffiti, Society, Places and Things, Personages, Sleep, Pleasures, Body of a Woman, Portraits – Artists, Writers, Friends and The Street. Each is very different from the next – reflecting the diversity of Brassaï’s photographic work.

Brassaï is organised by Fundación MAPFRE in collaboration with Foam.

More information: Foam Museum
More exhibitions: All About Photo

Saturday, October 19, 2019

London: Shot in Soho at Photographer's Gallery

Although the area of Soho is relatively small (one square mile) and bordered by some of London’s richest and most commercialised streets, it has remained a complex place of unorthodoxy, diversity, tolerance and defiance.

Shot in Soho is an original exhibition celebrating Soho’s diverse culture, community and history of creative innovation as well as highlighting its position as a site of resistance.

John Goldblatt Untitled, from the series ‘The Undressing Room’, 1968 © John Goldblatt Courtesy of the artist’s estate

Through a range of photographs, ephemera and varied presentations, the project reflects the breadth of life in a part of the capital that has always courted controversy and celebrated difference. It comes at a time when the area is facing radical transition and transformation with the imminent completion of Cross Rail (a major transport hub being built on Soho’s borders) set to make a landmark impact on the area.   

This is a rare opportunity to see outstanding images from renowned photographers including William Klein, Anders Petersen, Corinne Day, alongside other photographers whose work in Soho is lesser known such as Kelvin Brodie, Clancy Gebler Davies and John Goldblatt. The show also includes a new commission by Daragh Soden.

The exhibition draws on the history, the myths and the characters of this hotbed of unpredictability, disobedience, eccentricity and tightly-knit communities.

Part movie-set, part crime scene, part unfolding spectacle, Soho in recent decades has been the centre of the music, fashion, design, film and the sex industry – a place of unresolved riddles, a place of shadows and also somewhere to call home for incoming French, Italian, Maltese, Chinese, Hungarian, Jewish and Bengali communities – perhaps here is the prototype for multicultural open London.

Aston­ishingly Soho has remained a village at heart – maybe due in part to the way it was purposefully hidden from view behind Nash’s sweeping Regent Street crescent – there tucked away and locked within a tight street grid that has remained unchanged for centuries.

In many ways Soho has remained London’s rebellious teenager. It has been a place where anything goes and as creative as it has been sleazy.

At the Photographer's Gallery until February 9, 2020
More information: HERE
More exhibitions: HERE

Anders Petersen Soho, 2011 © Anders Petersen Courtesy of the artist

London: Feast for the Eyes – The Story of Food in Photography

Exploring the rich history of food photography through some of the leading figures and movements within the genre including: Nobuyoshi Araki, Nan Goldin, Martin Parr, Man Ray, Cindy Sherman, Wolfgang Tillmans and Weegee.

Encompassing fine-art and vernacular photography, commercial and scientific images, photojournalism and fashion, the exhibition looks at the development of this form and the artistic, social and political contexts that have informed it.

Weegee Phillip J. Stazzone is on WPA and enjoys his favourite food as he’s heard that the Army doesn’t go in very strong for serving spaghetti, 1940 © Weegee/International Center of Photography,


Food has always been a much-photographed and consumed subject, offering a test ground for artistic experimentation and a way for artists to hone their skills. But even the most representative images of food have rarely been straightforward or objective. Food as subject matter is rich in symbolic meaning and across the history of art, has operated as a vessel for artists to explore a particular emotion, viewpoint or theme and express a range of aspirations and social constructs. With the advent of social media, interest in food photography has become widespread with the taking and sharing of images becoming an integral part of the dining experience itself, used as instant signifiers of status and exacerbating a sense of belonging and difference.

Feast for the Eyes looks particularly at how food is represented and used in photographic practices and brings together a broad-range of artists all of whom harness the history and popularity of food photography to express wider themes. Crossing public and private realms the works on show evoke deep-seated questions and anxieties about issues such as wealth, poverty, consumption, appetite, tradition, gender, race, desire, pleasure, revulsion and domesticity.

Presented over two floors, and featuring over 140 works, from black and white silver gelatin prints and early experiments with colour processes to contemporary works, the exhibition is arranged around three key themes: Still Life traces food photography’s relationship to one of the most popular genres in painting and features work that is both inspired by the tradition and how it has changed in the course of time. Around the Table looks at the rituals that takes place around the consumption of food and the cultural identities reflected through the food we eat and people we eat with. Finally, Playing with Food shows what happens when food photography is infused with humour, fun and irony. The exhibition will also feature a number of magazines and cookbooks which provide an additional visual and social history of food photography.

Feast for the Eyes traces the history and effect of food in photography, simultaneously exploring our appetite for such images while celebrating the richness and artistic potential of one of the most popular, compulsive and ubiquitous of photographic genres.

Exhibition organised by Aperture, New York
Curated by Susan Bright and Denise Wolff

At the Photographer's Gallery until February 9, 2020
More information: HERE
Find out more exhibitions: All About Photo

Martin Parr New Brighton, England, 1983–85 © Martin Parr/Magnum Photos

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Milan: Rankin from Portraiture to Fashion

In the first its kind, Rankin's first solo exhibition in Milan since his 2016 Fashion Week project Outside In, Rankin: From Portraiture to Fashion allows the iconic photographer to experiment with one of his most complex gallery productions to date. Showcasing Rankin's picks of his favourite images - including those of his best known subjects and his more conceptual work. Rankin: From Portraiture to Fashion is an archival tour through Rankin's best known work and introduces this industry-leading photographer to a new generation of photography collectors. Taking place across four months this show will rotate work, constantly evolving in time with Milan's cultural calendar - celebrating, amongst others, Vogue Photo Festival (November), Fashion Film Festival (November) and Women's Fashion Week (February). Allowing the photographer to explore not only his own work but the cultural appetites and changing moods of a leading European city.

Eva in Green 2010, Elle Russia, Model: Eva Green © Rankin  
On view at 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS from October 18 until February 24, 2020

More about the exhibition: 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS
More exhibitions: All About Photo